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Five power foods that make your mind younger (syndicated)

Idaho Statesman - May 15, 2009 - By Mehmet Oz & Mike Roizen

Eggs. Selenium is among the good stuff in this favorite breakfast food. Get enough of that element, and your brain may perform as well as someone who's 10 years younger. Aim for 55 micrograms daily (eggs have 14 each; put them on whole-grain bread and add 10 mcg per slice).

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Stretch your food dollar: Tips for sensible shopping

Post-Bulletin (MN) - May 12, 2009 - By Holly Ebel

"You can save money by making some sensible food choices," she said. "Shop for seasonal fruits and vegetables. Eggs are low in cost for the protein they provide, and also pay attention to canned and refried beans as well as lentils and peanut butter, all excellent sources of fiber and protein."

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For healthy, tasty eggs, don't use just the whites

The Times Online (Associated Press) - May 11, 2009 - By Jim Romanoff

Eggs are packed with nutrients, and most them -- vitamins A and E, folate, calcium, iron and lutein -- are in the yolks. Sure, yolks also pack dietary cholesterol, but many scientists now think saturated fat is the bigger culprit in raising blood cholesterol.

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Eggs: Incredible and edible

San Diego Union-Tribune -May 8, 2009 - By Caroline Dipping

May is National Egg Month. With more people watching their wallets and eating at home, budget-friendly and versatile eggs easily go from breakfast to dinner. A large egg has 75 calories and is a good source of vitamin B-12.

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Top 7 foods under $1

Zesty Cook - May 5, 2009

Eggs. You can get about a half dozen of eggs for a dollar, making them one of the cheapest and most versatile sources of protein. Serving suggestions: Poached Eggs for breakfast, egg salad sandwiches for lunch, and frittatas for dinner. More...

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Gear up scores!

The Cincinnati Enquirer (OH)(print only) - May 9, 2009

The morning of the test: Eat a protein-rich diet two or three hours before your test. Proteins are broken down into amino acids, which are associated with alertness and mental agility. Good protein foods include low-fat yogurt, eggs, cottage cheese, nuts, fruits and berries.

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Breakfast choices impact hunger and calorie consumption throughout the day

Obesity, Fitness and Wellness Week (print only)- May 9, 2009

New studies presented this week at Experimental Biology 2009 enhance the growing body of evidence supporting the nutritional benefits of eggs. Research presented at the meeting demonstrates that choosing eggs for breakfast can help adults manage hunger while reducing calorie consumption throughout the day.

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Eggs. Yep, they're incredible and edible

Farm and Dairy (OH)- May 7, 2009 - By Laurie Marlatt Steeb

No matter where you get your eggs they are a wonderful food. The American Egg Board has proclaimed May as National Egg Month. States across the country will be joining in the celebration of "the incredible edible egg" and there are many reasons why the egg should be so honored. Varying amounts of 13 vitamins and many minerals are supplied by eggs. More...

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Nutritious foods for healthy cheapskates

Salisbury Post (NC) - May 3, 2009

At about 78 calories per egg (hard-boiled, nothing added), they're a good source of protein and high in nutrients. Although not everybody can handle straight-up hard-boiled eggs, I like them as a snack at work - much healthier than getting a candy bar or crackers from a vending machine - cheaper, too. More...

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Eggs for breakfast for easier weight loss

Lost Nutrition Data - May 1, 2009 - By Monica Reinagel, M.S., LD/N

A suite of new studies presented recently at the 2009 Experimental Biology meeting reinforces that eggs can be a great addition to both heart-healthy and weight-loss diet plans. A suite of new studies presented recently at the 2009 Experimental Biology meeting reinforces that eggs can be a great addition to both heart-healthy and weight-loss diet plans. More...

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Cooking Light...Eggs exactly right

Cooking Light (print only) - May, 2009

Eggs are economical and may just be the world's most versatile food. Their natural taste makes them a good vehicle for an array of flavors, and because they coagulate when cooked, they do work that no other ingredient can perform, binding foods like custard and providing structure in countless other recipes. Eggs also fit conveniently into a healthful diet.

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Experts are thinking about what you eat. Maybe you should join them.

Washington Post - April 28, 2009 - By Jennifer Huget

And it's hard to beat the nutrients-per-cost of beans, eggs and milk, especially powdered milk, canned tuna, soups. . . . We need to advise people what those foods are, where you can get them and how to cook them. More...

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Increase your willpower

Dietitian Mom (USA Today blog) - April 16, 2009 - By Elizabeth Ward, M.S., R.D.

Eat regular meals and snacks. Your brain needs a constant source of energy to run on all cylinders. To maximize brain function, make sure each meal or snack contains a source of protein, such as low-fat dairy foods, beans, eggs, or lean meats like pork tenderloin, ham, chicken, turkey, beef, or seafood, and complex carbohydrates, such as whole grains. More...

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The egg - it is pretty incredible. And definitely edible.

Every Food Fits - April 16, 2009

Eggs - an easy-to-prepare, nutrient-rich dietary staple for around 70 calories. Not to mention an economically friendly addition to any meal. Worried about the yolk? Yes, the yolk does contain cholesterol, but also provides Vitamin A, Vitamin D, phosphorus, folate and calcium. More...

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7 egg facts

Fooducate - April 12, 2009

1. They are a cheap and reliable source of protein, especially for vegetarians.

2. Eggs are one of few foods naturally containing vitamin D.

3. They are also a good source of vitamin A, riboflavin, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, choline, iron, calcium, phosphorus and potassium.

4. The yolk is about one third of the weight of the egg, but accounts for 80% of its 75 calories.

5. The currently popular omega-3 eggs are created by feeding hens with kelp meal (more seaweed, anyone?).

6. Eggs have seesawed in popularity over the years due to their high cholesterol count (over 65% of the recommended daily intake). Current studies are pointing favorably to the egg, claiming most of the cholesterol formed in the human body results from saturated and trans-fats, and not the cholesterol in the egg. Eggs have no trans-fat and only 8% of the daily value for saturated fat.

7. There are many foods created with raw eggs. Mayonnaise and chocolate mousse are two very popular examples.

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Egg-xellent weight watchers

WABI - TV5 (ME) - April 16, 2009

Contrary to popular belief, eggs are not bad for you. Each one contains just 75 calories, provides 13 essential nutrients and is an excellent source of high-quality protein. The whites do not contain any fat and while the yolks do contain a high amount of dietary cholesterol, that is not the type of cholesterol normally associated with heart disease.

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Eggs offer plenty of benefits for your health

Herald-Dispatch (WV) - April 11, 2009

They're a great source of protein, with 6 grams per egg, to help build and repair muscle, according to incredibleegg.org. Eggs also are a good source of riboflavin, which aids digestion and helps in the functioning of the nervous system, and choline, which is particularly important for pregnant and nursing women because it helps with babies' brain development.

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It's not as bad as you think

According to the April 16 issue of the Arizona Farm Bureau's Agriculture and Farm Bureau News, we should look at food prices a century ago ago before we complain. Julie Murphree writes, "With the constant talk about high food prices, it is important to keep things in proper perspective. One way to do that is to look at prices 100 years ago and compare them with prices today. For example, the real, inflation-adjusted wholesale price of eggs this year is about 82 cents. That's a decline of 92 percent compared to the price of eggs in this country in the early 1900s ($10.50 in 1908 in today's dollars). And grocery prices in general, for a 12-item basket, have fallen in real price by 82 percent between 1919 and 2007.

"What's more, food -- both at home and away -- has never been more affordable. Expenditures as a percent of income were in double-digits throughout the 20th century and above 20 percent for most of the time during 1929 through 1952. Since 2000, spending on food has fallen below 10 percent of disposable income. In 2005 through 2007 it was at 9.8 percent."

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Howard Helmer Segment

The Morning Show with Mike & Juliet - April 10, 2009

Howard Helmer showcased his omelet-making skills and discussed how to make hard-cooked eggs for Easter.

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Protein-rich eggs are inexpensive, incredibly versatile

The Grand Rapids Press (MI) - April 8, 2009 - By Kathy Carrier

For Easter brunch, a make-ahead egg casserole, egg strata or baked French toast make holiday hosting easier. Eggs can be poached for eggs Benedict or baked in the oven in puff pastry shells. Beaten and folded, eggs lighten cakes and souffles. Beaten with milk, they produce creamy custards. And when the whites are whipped, they turn into frothy meringue.

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Six ways to make the basic deviled egg a standout on your table

Seattle Times - April 8, 2009 - By Steve Petusevsky

With Easter approaching, I think about eggs. Although some vegetarians don't eat them, I think that without eggs, many classical dishes could never be made. Hollandaise sauce without eggs? Forget it. Many casserole dishes, baked goods and brunch dishes would have never been created.

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Why you should eat your Easter eggs

McClatchy Newspapers (Syndicated) - April 8, 2009 - By Barbra Quinn

Egg protein is the highest quality protein on the planet. It contains all the essential amino acids needed by the human body to build valuable proteins. Protein is found in the yolk as well as the white of the egg.

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Put those Easter eggs to good use - in your mouth

The Record Searchlight (CA) - April 7, 2009 - By Debra Moore

They can be peeled and eaten as a nutritious snack. According to the American Egg Board, a typical large egg contains 75 calories and more than 6 grams of protein. Eggs contain many vitamins and minerals and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which reduce the risk of serious eye disease.

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Savings eggs-travaganza

Alton Telegraph (IL) - April 7, 2009 - By Teresa J. Farney

When times get tough, the tough get cracking, using eggs to stretch their food dollars. At 15 to 25 cents per egg, they pack a big bang for the buck. Plus they are a nutritional powerhouse.

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Protein at eggs-actly the right price

McClatchy Newspapers (Syndicated) - April 7, 2009 - By Sharon Thompson

If you have a carton of eggs in the refrigerator, you can have a nutritious breakfast, lunch or dinner for pennies. Protein foods are the most expensive items on the food budget, and when you compare the cost per serving to other protein foods, the egg comes out a winner.

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Cheap tricks: The incredible egg

The Washington Post - April 7, 2009 - By Kim O'Donnel

Looking for cheap protein during hard times? Have an egg for supper. Despite the financial challenges we're all facing at the supermarket checkout, the cost of a dozen eggs remains a serious bargain.

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Get more eggs in your diet

Statesville Record & Landmark (NC) - April 5, 2009 - By Julie Whittington

In general, I encourage consumers to eat eggs as part of a well-balanced diet. First, one egg has about 6 grams of protein. Protein is very important at all your meals - not just lunch and dinner. Incorporating protein at breakfast may help stave off hunger, reduce cravings later in the day, balance blood sugars and increase your ability to focus during the day.

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For healthy, tasty eggs, don't use just the whites

Foster's Daily Democrat (NH) - April 5, 2009 - By Jim Romanoff

Health-conscious cooks routinely toss the yolks and stick with the whites when preparing eggs. Good idea? Not necessarily. Eggs are packed with nutrients, and most them - vitamins A and E, folate, calcium, iron and lutein - are in the yolks.

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How to Hard-Cook Eggs

Mr. Food - ABC 7 (IL) - April 3, 2009

Join Mr. Food and his guest, egg expert Howard Helmer, the World's Fastest Omelet Maker, for easy tips on how to hard cook eggs just in time for Easter and Passover entertaining. Hard-cooked eggs are the star of our spring holiday season. With Passover and Easter festivities days away, eggs are either in our fridge or on our shopping list.

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Disney hatches an egg-cellent idea for kids

Orlando Sentinel - April 2, 2009 - By Linda Florea

Neither Disney eggs nor generic eggs contain additives, preservatives or hormones, which are not permitted in egg production. "Eggs are very good for kids, with the protein and nutrients they get," Lanktree said. "When we did research, mothers were excited to have a high-quality food and efficient protein source that kids would like to eat."

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Eggs any way can make a feast

Macon Telegraph (GA) - April 1, 2009 - By Steve Peusevsky

With Easter approaching, I think about eggs. Although some vegetarians don't eat them, I think that without eggs, many classical dishes could never be made. Hollandaise sauce without eggs? Forget it. Many casserole dishes, baked goods and brunch dishes would have never been created. Eggs are literally the glue that binds hundreds of recipes from pies to pasta.

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Are eggs healthy for babies?

Baby Talk - April 2009 - By Patty Onderko

Infants actually need more fat and cholesterol than adults for their still-developing brains and organs. So your baby can handle a whole egg every day. Plus, not only does the yolk contain half of the protein in the egg, it carries most of the egg's 13 essential nutrients, including hard-to-get choline, folate, and vitamin D.

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Is healthy eating expensive? Try these 20 foods at $1 each

ABC 15 (AZ)- March 30, 2009 - By Jennifer Harrington

Eggs - It costs about a dollar for a half dozen eggs, making them one of the cheapest and most versatile sources of protein.

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Little changes add up to longer life

The Tennessean - March 28, 2009

Instead of a bagel with butter for breakfast, try scrambled eggs on whole wheat toast. This fill-you-up breakfast won't fill you out. More and more research is showing that people who include protein in their breakfasts (eggs are a great source) as part of a low-calorie diet lose more weight. Eggs are also loaded with disease-fighting nutrients such as choline (linked to lower rates of breast cancer) and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin (which may help prevent macular degeneration).

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Easter Egg Safety Tips:

Eggs will last a long time in your refrigerator; in fact in Arizona they are deemed edible 30 days past the expiration date printed on outer packaging. But, they will only last a short time if your decorated eggs are placed out on display. If you are going to eat your Easter eggs, you need to follow safety precautions:

  • Boil eggs well. Place eggs in cold water. Let the water come to a boil, then lower it to a slow boil for ten minutes.
  • After cooking, put the eggs in the refrigerator until ready to use. Boiling eggs removes the protective coating applied by producers, making them more susceptible to bacteria.
  • When decorating, take a few out of the refrigerator at a time.
  • Decorate and put them back into the refrigerator as soon as possible.
  • If you are using the decorated eggs for display for any length of time, use our simple, safe rule..... don't eat them.
  • You can tell an egg is hard cooked if you spin it on its side; a fresh egg will spin smoothly and a hard cooked egg will wobble.

Read and follow safe handling instructions printed on packaging. Always wash hands when handling any food.

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Eggs Reduce Blood Pressure??

Researchers in Canada are reporting evidence that eggs - often frowned upon for their high cholesterol content - may reduce another heart disease risk factor - high blood pressure. They describe identification of egg proteins that act like a popular group of prescription medications in lowering blood pressure. The report appeared in the Feb. 11 issue of ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication.

In the new study, Jianping Wu and Kaustav Majumder note that eggs are an inexpensive source of high-quality protein and other nutrients. Egg consumption, however, has decreased during the last 40 years amid concerns about cholesterol. Recent studies do suggest that healthy people can eat eggs without increasing their heart disease risk. Other research hinted that certain egg proteins might have effects similar to ACE inhibitors, prescription drugs used to treat high blood pressure.

Pursuing that lead in laboratory studies, the scientists identified several different peptides in boiled and fried eggs that act as potent ACE inhibitors. The scientists showed that enzymes in the stomach and small intestine produce these peptides from eggs. Fried eggs had the highest ACE inhibitory activity. It will take studies in humans to determine if the egg proteins do lower blood pressure in people, the scientists emphasized. Funding for the research came from livestock and poultry industry groups.

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New Research Shows High-Quality Protein in Eggs Contributes to Power, Strength and Energy

Eggs provide affordable source of high-quality protein for sustained energy

Park Ridge, Ill. (February 17, 2009) - A research review published recently in Nutrition Today1 affirms that the high-quality protein in eggs makes a valuable contribution to muscle strength, provides a source of sustained energy and promotes satiety. High-quality protein is an important nutrient for active individuals at all life stages, and while most Americans consume the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein, additional research suggests that some Americans are not consuming enough high-quality protein to achieve and maintain optimal health. - More...

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STUDY: Hen Health Better, Mortality Lower in Modern Cage Production

According to new research conducted by the National Veterinary Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, hens housed in modern cage systems are at a lesser risk of mortality, cannibalism and disease than hens housed in free-range and cage-free systems. The study was conducted to identify causes for the increased deaths seen in flocks transitioning from modern cage housing to alternatives ahead of the European Union's 2012 ban of cage production.

From the study, bacterial diseases, viral diseases, parasitic diseases, and even cannibalism accounted for the increase in deaths of hens housed in free-range and cage-free systems. Researchers note that the study could have implications outside of Sweden given the housing systems used in the study are similar to those used throughout Europe and the United States. - AgProfessional

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AFBF has launched a new consumer Web site

The American Farm Bureau Federation has launched a Web site targeted to consumers. The site, Your Agriculture, at www.fb.org/yourag, helps educate the non-farming public about agriculture issues, farmers and ranchers, and the food, fiber and fuel they produce.

"The average American is three generations removed from the farm and does not have a clear understanding of where their food comes from," said AFBF Director of Public Relations Don Lipton. "We hope this new Web site will help us engage in conversation with consumers about modern agricultural production while shedding light on issues faced by America's farmers and ranchers."

The Your Agriculture site includes a section profiling a farmer or rancher each month with an audio slideshow and Q&A. The site also includes a series of quizzes to test the public's farm IQ and a consumers' guide to farm policy and agriculture issues. Farm fact sheets, a foodie blog and video stories from the public television series "America's Heartland" can also be found on the new site.

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New Study "Pardons" the Misunderstood Egg
Eggs Contribute Insignificant Risk to Heart Disease

Edelman Nutrition News Bureau - December 16, 2008

Park Ridge, Ill. (December 16, 2008) - A study recently published online in the journal Risk Analysis1 estimates that eating one egg per day is responsible for less than 1 percent of the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in healthy adults. Alternatively, lifestyle factors including poor diet, smoking, obesity and physical inactivity contribute 30 to 40 percent of heart disease risk, depending on gender. This study adds to more than thirty years of research showing that healthy adults can eat eggs without significantly affecting their risk of heart disease.

Study Background

The study evaluated the risk of heart disease associated with egg consumption compared to modifiable lifestyle risk factors (smoking, poor diet, being overweight or obese, physical inactivity). The study authors used data from the 1999-2000 and 2001-2001 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) to categorize the U.S. adult population into various groups based on modifiable lifestyle risks. These populations account for 85 percent of all U.S. males ages 25 and older and 86 percent of U.S. females ages 25 and older.

Study Findings

The study found that the consumption of one egg per day contributes less than 1 percent of heart disease risk. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors - smoking, poor diet, being overweight or obese and physical inactivity - accounted for 30 to 40 percent of heart disease risk, while unavoidable risk factors, such as genetics, and potentially treatable risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, accounted for 60 to 70 percent.

According to the authors, the NHANES data show that very few Americans are leading lifestyles that may reduce the risk of heart disease: only 3 percent of males and 6 percent of females have none of the modifiable lifestyle risk factors that were investigated. The study authors conclude that efforts to prioritize risk factors and eliminate those that have the largest impact on health are more likely to reduce heart disease risk than recommendations to restrict egg consumption.

"This study should influence health professionals to finally acknowledge decades of research showing that egg consumption is not a significant risk factor for heart disease," said Leila M. Barraj, Senior Managing Scientist in Exponent's Health Sciences Center for Chemical Regulation and Food Safety. "The health community should focus on meaningful recommendations when it comes to preventing heart disease, like smoking and obesity, not egg consumption."

Egg Benefits Outweigh Risks

    The study, which was funded by the Egg Nutrition Center, substantiates decades of research challenging the outdated myth that the cholesterol in eggs is linked to increased heart disease risk. Moreover, the study authors note that their analysis did not adjust for the health promoting benefits of eggs which may, in fact, decrease heart disease risk. For example:

  • Research has found that overweight men who eat eggs while on a carbohydrate-restricted diet have a significant increase in their HDL levels (the "good" cholesterol) compared to men who do not eat eggs.2
  • In a recent study, eating two eggs for breakfast, as part of a reduced-calorie diet, helped overweight or obese adults lose 65 percent more weight and reduce their BMIs by 61 percent more than those eating a bagel breakfast of equal calories. In addition, the study found no significant differences between the HDL and LDL cholesterol levels of the egg and bagel eaters.3
  • Eggs are an excellent source of choline. A 2008 study concluded that a diet rich in choline and betaine, a nutrient related to choline, is associated with lower concentrations of homocysteine in the blood. High blood levels of homocysteine are indicative of chronic inflammation, which has been associated with cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and dementia.4

Eggs offer a number of beneficial nutrients. One egg has 13 essential vitamins and minerals and is an excellent source of choline and selenium and a good source of high-quality protein, vitamin B 12, phosphorus and riboflavin. In addition to providing one of the most affordable sources of all-natural, high-quality protein, eggs provide a valuable source of energy and help maintain and build the muscle tissue needed for strength.

For More Information
- Contact the Egg Media Hotline to speak with a researcher or registered dietitian.
- Visit the Egg Nutrition Center for information on the nutritional benefits of eggs and the American Egg Board for egg recipes and preparation tips.


1 Barraj, et al. A comparison of egg consumption with other modifiable coronary heart disease lifestyle risk factors: A relative risk apportionment study. Risk Analysis. Published online November 4, 2008.
2 Mutungi, G et al. Dietary cholesterol from eggs increases plasma HDL cholesterol in overweight men consuming a carbohydrate restricted diet. J Nutr. 2008; 138:272-276.
3 Vanderwal JS et al , et al. Egg breakfast enhances weight loss. Int J of Obesity, published online on August 5, 2008.
4 Detopoulou, Paraskevi et al. Dietary choline and betaine intakes in relation to concentrations of inflammatory markers in healthy adults: the ATTICA study. AJCN 2008; 87:424-430

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Breakthrough foods with a hidden health bonus

Woman's World - December 2008

Before you reach for another bowl of cereal, consider this: A brand-new Purdue University study shows that protein-rich foods have extra hunger-killing power when we eat them in the morning. "Protein is the best nutrient for triggering satiety. And when you eat it in the morning the benefits start early and last all day," notes lead researcher Heather Leidy, Ph.D.


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Anything With an Egg on Top

Bon Appetit - January 2009 issue
By Jill Silverman Hough

Not only is the egg the world's most perfect food, it's also one of the most economical ways to add protein and luscious richness to all kinds of dishes. And we can't think of anything more sunny and inviting than an egg, poached or fried, sitting atop our favorite pasta, pizza, or salad. Take a crack at this fun new trend with the three incentive recipes that follow.


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Scrambled Eggs Never Sounded So Good

News Blaze - December 2008
By Stephan Kaliss

The delicious diversity and ultimate potential of an egg is enough reason to consider them seriously. To cook well, you have to know the egg. Those that cannot cook an egg cannot cook.


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Eggs may prevent breast cancer

United Press International - December 2008

A woman who has the nutrient choline - found in eggs - while pregnant might reduce her daughter's risk of breast cancer significantly, U.S. researchers said.


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4 easy ways to live healthy in December

Redbook - December 2008

Here's a new way to get cracking on weight loss: Adults who ate two eggs every morning as part of a reduced-calorie diet lost 65 percent more weight and reported more energy than those who ate a bagel for breakfast, according to a recent study.


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Eating your way to good health

News 8 Austin - November 18, 2008
By Sarah Krieger

Eggs offer a variety of health benefits. Just one egg provides 6 grams of protein and all nine essential amino acids. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, nutrients in eggs, including vitamins B12 and D, riboflavin and folate, may lower heart disease risk.


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Eat more healthfully while stretching food budget

The Tampa Tribune - November 15, 2008

Go meatless once in a while. One of the biggest food expenses is meat. Rely on eggs. They are a great source of protein. Hard-boiled eggs are great snack items.


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Eating Healthy On A Budget

CBS News - The Early Show - November 18, 2008
Keri Glassman Tells How To Pack Most Nutritional Bang Into Relatively Low-Cost Meals

EGGS - High in protein, low in carbohydrates, source of brain-boosting choline, cheap, and easy to use. The yellow of the egg does contain cholesterol, so if you're watching your cholesterol, limit your consumption of the yellow (yolk); otherwise, the white can be eaten all day long! Eggs can be used to make frittatas, omelets, egg salad, sliced on top of crackers, and hard-boiled with a little salt and pepper as a snack.
Serving size: 1 Large egg; Price per serving: 19 cents; Nutrition per serving: whole egg: 70 cals, 4.5 g fat, 6 g pro, 6 percent Vit A, 2 percent Calcium, 4 percent DV Iron; egg white: 17 calories, 0 fat, 3.6 g pro


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Can Less Money Equal Better Eating?

ABCNews.com - June 19, 2008
By Keith Ayoob (Egg Ambassador)

Even with recent price increases, eggs and milk beat beef, hands down. Two eggs are only about 40 cents -- that's $1.60 for a family of four. A glass of milk is about 25 cents -- cheaper than even a bargain can of soda. Milk and eggs also provide at least a dozen important nutrients each, so they're rock-solid nutrition sources.


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Deviled eggs are always a favorite

The Washington Times - May 14, 2008

Eggs are full of nutrients. Egg whites provide high-quality protein, and eggs yolks are a good source of absorbable iron, a key nutrient in blood building. Recent research shows that egg yolks offer two deep-yellow pigments, lutein and zeaxanthin, that are thought to offer health benefits for the eyes.


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High protein diet helps keep weight off

CTV News (Canada) - May 2008

A high-protein diet may be better for keeping weight off once it's been lost, according to early results from a European study. In these preliminary findings, researchers compared high and low protein diets with those based on the glycemic index (GI). High protein diets include lots of meat, fish, eggs, beans and lentils.


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Quick family meals on a budget

Baby Bites Book - May 12, 2008

Think outside the bun for convenience. No time to cook? Scramble a few eggs. Make a veggie frittata with last night's stir fried veggies. Eggs are still the cheapest, contain nature's perfect protein and 13 essential nutrients including choline.


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Calories in eggs

The "Gone Forever" Weight Loss Reporter - May 13, 2008

Eggs are good for you when you're losing weight because they have good protein content. People tend to neglect protein in their helter-skelter rush to lower their calorie intake. How many calories in an egg? A normal large size egg contains about 75 calories - 58 calories in the yolk and 17 in the white.


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An egg-selent idea for slowing down Alzheimer's

This is Your Brain on Psych Drugs - May 15, 2008

Aaahhh eggs, the misunderstood member of the nutrition family. Poor guys...when I graduated from college, in the height of the low cholesterol-low fat craze, we were indoctrinated to teach that "egg" was just another word for poison. My how things have changed!


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Fast-food fixes

Men's Fitness article - June/July 2008 issue

Eat this at Dunkin Donuts. Skip your regular Double Chocolate ritual. Instead, fuel up with an Egg Cheese English Muffin Sandwich plus a Latte Lite for a hefty dose of protein and calcium.


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Egg-cellent news

Quick & Simple, May 20, 2008

The incredible edible boasts a heretofore unknown health benefit: cutting breast cancer risk. Experts at the University of North Carolina found that increased consumption of choline, a nutrient found in egg yolks, lowers breast cancer risk by a whopping 24 percent. Get extra protection by eating an egg daily or serving up other choline-rich foods like nuts and beef, suggests study author Steven Zeisel, M.D.


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"Cracking open" heart health myths

The Manchester Press (IA) - May 6, 2008

Not only have decades of research shown no association between egg intake and heart disease risk, but eggs are an excellent source of choline, which plays an important role in breaking down homocysteine, an amino acid in the blood that may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease.


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Eggs erase negativity!

Woman's World - May 5, 2008

Eggs are loaded with folic acid, a B vitamin that studies suggest is one of the most mood-elevating nutrients, says nutritionist Tammy Lakatos Shames, R.D., coauthor of Fire Up Your Metabolism. Turns out, up to 38 percent of women who experience depression have low levels of folic acid - and those with the lowest are the most depressed.


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Fill your grocery cart without busting your budget

MSNBC.com - May 16, 2008

There are some strategies you can follow to help avoid grocery sticker shock, says Phil Lempert, TODAY food editor. Here's what he suggests: Dodge impulse traps - stores are set up to spur impulse buying. Focus on staples such as milk, eggs, bread and canned or frozen veggies and avoid tempting cookies and cakes in the deli section.

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Natural Medicine: Curb those carb cravings.

Excerpted from The Post Intelligencer - February 3, 2008

Eating a substantial breakfast that includes a good amount of protein, like one to two eggs, one yogurt or 3 ounces of meat is an energizing way to start the day. After breakfast, it is important to continue fueling ourselves throughout the day with high-quality meals and snacks that include protein.

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Partnership Helps Feed the Hungry.

American Egg Board (AEB) is supporting the United Egg Producers (UEP) in an initiative to partner with America’s Second Harvest – The Nation’s Food Bank Network, in a 50 for 50 Plan in which egg producers will donate eggs in an effort to help feed those most in need in the United States.

As part of the plan, egg producers from all 50 states agree to donate eggs to America’s Second Harvest, which will then match any donations made.

One egg producer with experience in food bank donations is Arizona-based Hickman’s Family Farms. Hickman has donated its eggs to food banks throughout Arizona.

Clint Hickman, co-owner of Hickman’s Family Farms, believes the donations serve as a way for his company to get involved with the community and provide underprivileged families the opportunity to enjoy traditions, such as egg painting.

"A lot of underprivileged people don't have a chance to buy eggs to do that," Hickman said.

In commenting on the partnership with AEB and UEP, America’s Second Harvest Director of New Business & Partnership Development, Douglas Montgomery, said, “I do not have enough words to express our appreciation for what you have all done to help develop a plan for feeding thousands of those identified as food insecure. I am very encouraged by the breadth of support from producers, carton manufacturers, UEP and AEB toward our common goal.”

America’s Second Harvest is the nation’s largest charitable hunger- relief organization, serving over 25 million Americans each year.

 

Excerpted page from AEB newsletter - December 17, 2007

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Egg Industry Battles Animal Extremists.

Animal rights extremist groups which are opposed to the consumption of all meat, dairy, poultry and fish are now trying to eliminate another nutritious and inexpensive protein and nutrient source from the grocery aisle: eggs.

"What's wrong with eggs?" you might ask. Well, animal rights activists don't like the modern egg production housing systems that provide consumers with the freshest, safest, cleanest eggs in the world. And they don't like the fact that these modern production housing systems provide eggs to consumers at a cost of only about one dollar per dozen at grocery stores… rather than two dollars or three dollars for cage free or free range eggs. Because less expensive prices for eggs probably means that more Americans can afford to buy and eat eggs… which animal activists are opposed to!

These modern egg production housing systems provide egg-laying hens with food, clean water, fresh air and cages that allow hens to stand, turn around, lie down, stretch and preen. Hens protected in these modern housing systems tend to have fewer diseases and better mortality rates.

In an effort to drive up egg prices and reduce or eliminate the consumption of eggs in the United States, several animal rights activist groups are trying to get these modern egg production cage and housing systems outlawed by city councils and state legislatures, portraying these modern marvels as cruel and inhumane "factory farming." These groups, which include People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), succeeded in getting legislation introduced this year in seven state legislatures. Thankfully, reason prevailed and these initiatives were defeated.

But now, these activists are making an end-run around the legislative process and attempting to get vaguely worded initiatives placed on the ballots next year in California and Colorado that would accomplish the same thing: eliminate modern production cage housing systems. The result would be to triple retail egg prices and deny consumers the right to make their own choice about what type of eggs they can afford: conventional, cage free, organic, etc.

But because these initiatives would ban the modern production methods used in eggs, not the actual sale of these eggs, imports from Mexico, China and other countries likely would replace the local family farm eggs that most grocers and consumers are buying now. The animal welfare and food safety guidelines and track records of other countries have never been a match for the U.S. food production system.

The egg industry has organized a forceful campaign to rebut the animal rights activists under their industry trade organization, United Egg Producers. You can read more about that campaign and the modern egg production methods at www.uepcertified.com.

Article Distributed by GolinHarris. Published in the following state grocery association publications: Connecticut Food Association, Illinois Food Retailers Association, Indiana Grocery & Convenience Store Association, Louisiana Retailers Association, Carolinas Food Industry Council, Oklahoma Grocers Association, Michigan Grocers Association, Missouri Grocers Association, Texas Retailers Association, Utah Food Industry Association, Wisconsin Grocers Association, Colorado Retail Council

 


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How to Blow the Shell Off a Hard Boiled Egg.

While anyone can peel a hard boiled egg, shells and all remaining on the white skin, it's a neat trick to blow the shell off and have the skin remaining soft, clean and ready to eat. Try it!

  1. Remove a little bit of shell from each end of the egg. Do this to an area about the size of a dime (very small coin) on the smaller end and about the size of a nickel (slightly larger coin) on the larger end.
  2. Roll the egg between your hands or on a hard surface to loosen the shell from the egg. This should produce small cracks throughout the shell.
  3. Hold the egg in your right hand. Keep the smaller end toward you.
  4. Form a circle with the thumb and index finder of your right hand that is about the same size as the opening on the smaller end of the egg. Be sure your thumb is over your index finger.
  5. Place the thumb/index finger circle over the opening on the small end.
  6. Place your left hand under and around your right hand, cupping the egg. Be sure that your thumbs fit together and make a seal. This seal is key in directing all the air into the shell and not letting it escape around it.
  7. Bring your hands and the egg to your mouth, forming a seal between your lips and the circle formed with your right hand.
  8. Take a deep breath and blow hard. It takes more air pressure than you think to push the egg from its shell.
  9. If necessary, repeat step 8 until the egg is out.
  10. Wash your hard-boiled treasure to remove any small pieces of shell left behind.

Tips...
  • Don't hold the egg too tightly. It needs room to escape the shell.
  • Soft-boiled eggs (7 minute eggs) can be blown also, but with limited success. Hard-boiled eggs (10 minutes or more) work the best.
  • If the egg doesn't come out on the first try, try again. Some are stubborn, but with coaxing, will finally yield.
  • Hickman's eggs work best.

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The sunny side of eggs.

Men's Health (Print only)
October 1, 2007


You may be missing out on an important nutrient. University of North Carolina researchers determined that men need 50 percent more choline, an essential B vitamin, than what's currently advised. Despite following a diet that provided the recommended daily intake of choline, the men in the study had elevated blood markers of muscle breakdown or liver damage- two symptoms of a choline deficiency. "You should consume 850 milligrams of choline a day, according to our research," says study author Steven Zeisel, M.D., Ph.D. You can meet your choline quota by eating two whole eggs a day: Yolks are the best source of the vitamin, followed closely by bacon.

 


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Whole Living - Tip.

Body & Soul Magazine (Print only)
October 1, 2007


Store eggs in the main body of the fridge in their original carton-even if you have on of those nifty door compartments. Eggs keep better at constant, cool temperatures (no higher than 40 degrees), and temps in the door fluctuate every time it opens. Plus, cartons keep eggs tasting fresh by blocking odors from other foods that can permeate their shells.

 


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Alzheimer's - Prevent it now!

Services of Health (Blog)
September 27, 2007


Levels of Choline decline as we age. Choline is a nutrient the brain uses to produce acetylcholine, which helps our memory. Choline is found in fish and eggs.

 

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Best Ten Nutrition Myths From Dieticians.

Food & Nutrition (Blog)
September 26, 2007


Brown Eggs are more nutritious than White Eggs Contrary to a widely believed nutrition myth, eggshell color can vary but it has nothing to do with the quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness of an egg. The eggshell color only depends upon the breed of the hen. According to the Egg Nutrition Council, "white shelled eggs are produced by hens with white feathers and white ear lobes and brown shelled eggs are produced by hens with red feathers and red ear lobes. There is no difference in taste or nutrition content between white and brown colored eggs".

 

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Study: Supplement For Supple Skin.

LookingFit.com
September 26, 2007


A new study suggests that oral supplements of lutein and zeaxanthin may provide some protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced skin damage and bolster the skin's natural antioxidant system.

Lutein is a naturally-occurring carotenoid found in egg yolk and green, leafy vegetables like spinach and kale. Zeaxanthin also is a carotenoid, and both nutrients have a history of being used as dietary supplements to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

 

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The Incredible Edible Egg.

Gather.com
September 26, 2007


Eggs are an excellent source of protein. The price in the market in this area has skyrocketted to over $1.60 a dozen for mediums. My Mother has been telling me of the great deals you can get at the egg farm and I finally made a trip to see for myself.

 

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Dilute your food budget without sacrificing flavor.

The Daily Advertiser (LA)
September 26, 2007
By Bob Moser


A friend pushed me toward eggs, because they're healthy and fill me well enough for the cost. I don't have time in the morning to scramble, so I'm boiling a dozen or so every weekend to have hard-boiled eggs handy for breakfast.

 

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The chicken or the egg?

Fitness 102 (Blog)
September 25, 2007


One egg provides about 6.25 grams of protein, or about 10% of daily protein needs. Half of the protein in an egg comes from the egg white, while the other half from the egg yolk. In fact, egg protein is of such high quality that it is used as the standard by which other proteins are compared.

 

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Eating locally on travel.

Lannae's Food and Travel (Blog)
September 23, 2007


Eggs are a great protein source, and can be cooked in the microwave. Scrambled is best, or else the yolk could explode. The best way is to scramble the eggs with a little milk, salt and pepper (taken from the breakfast room) and microwave, stirring every 30 sec - minute until done.

 

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Top 5 white foods to eat

Funk Roberts Fitness Blog
September 22, 2007


Who doesn't love eggs? Often referred to as 'the perfect protein,' egg protein is a staple due to its health benefits and ability to be readily digested and absorbed by the body. Egg whites in particular are low in calories, have no carbs, no fats, no cholesterol and are loaded with protein. An egg white can contain up to 6 grams of protein.

 

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Study finds spinach, eggs ward off cause of blindness

September 10, 2007


CHICAGO (Reuters) - Two nutrients found in eggs, spinach and other leafy green vegetables offer some protection against the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, researchers said on Monday.

Age-related macular degeneration affects 1.2 million Americans, mostly after age 65, and the irreversible condition gets gradually worse, robbing victims of the center of their vision. Many people may be susceptible due to genetic factors, while smoking is known to heighten the risk.

The two nutrients, lutein and zeaxanthin, are both carotenoids -- compounds that give many fruits and vegetables a yellow color.

They help ward off the condition, apparently by allowing the eyes to filter harmful short-wavelength light and by curtailing other damaging effects to the macula, or the center of the eye's retina, the researchers said.

"No clear associations with other nutrients were seen," including the vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, according to the researchers, led by John Paul SanGiovanni of the National Eye Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health in Maryland.

The 6-year study asked about the dietary habits of 4,519 people aged 60 to 80 when enrolled.

Those in the top fifth of dietary consumption of foods containing the two nutrients had 35 percent less chance of developing the condition compared to those in the lowest fifth of consumption.

"Lutein and zeaxanthin may be considered as useful agents in food or supplement-based interventions designed to reduce the risk of AMD," the researchers wrote in their report, published in the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

Foods considered good sources of the nutrients include eggs, spinach, kale, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, corn, garden peas and Brussels sprouts.

 

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Eat right during pregnancy for a better baby.

August 1, 2007 - By Lynda Murray


If you want your child to be healthy, vibrant, free from diabetes, heart disease and obesity, consider adding more foods such as omega eggs into their diet.

CHOLINE: Choline is a nutrient needed in larger amounts during pregnancy for normal brain function and memory. Studies report offspring with "supercharged" brains and superior memory when moms consumed more of this nutrient in pregnancy.

Best bet: Found in egg yolk, flaxseed, soybeans, oats and lentils. Eat eggs at least every other day during pregnancy. Aside from liver, which is not recommended, eggs are the richest source of this nutrient. (High intakes of vitamin A have been linked with birth defects. Liver is the only food that provides very high amounts of vitamin A.) Don't supplement with more than 5,000 IU of vitamin D each day. Many prenatal vitamins don't contain preformed vitamin A.

 

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Eggs are healthy and diet soda is not.

July 28, 2007 - By Vreni Gurd


Slowly the evidence is mounting that there is absolutely no need to be afraid of eating eggs, despite the fact that they are high in cholesterol. Hopefully soon the mainstream medical establishment will go that one step further and acknowledge that there is no association between cholesterol levels and heart disease. Hard-boiled eggs can be packed along as a healthy protein snack - much healthier than those processed protein bars that contain a list of chemicals a mile long, and just as convenient, and also much healthier than protein shakes made from protein-isolate. So, enjoy your eggs!

 

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Healthy Eggs: Are Eggs Healthy?

For more than 5,000 years, humans have enjoyed what may be one of nature’s most convenient and nutritious foods — the egg. Today per-person consumption averages around 300 eggs a year. Why eggs are healthy? Eggs provide high protein content for relatively low cost. They’re also relatively low in calories — one medium-sized egg contains just 78 calories. Eggs contain vitamins B12, C, D, E, and K, as well as the minerals iron and zinc. They’re also a rich source of choline, important for brain functioning and health.

 

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Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Kids

Better Homes & Gardens (Online)
Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Kids
July 2007 By Michele Meyer


Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Teach your kids about healthy breakfast choices with these tips.

Limit sugar in the morning. Serve a blend of fruit or whole grains along with some protein such as Canadian bacon or eggs.

Whip up some scrambled eggs, throw in a dash of bottled salsa or spicy cheese, add onions, peppers, or spinach, and wrap the mixture in a low-fat whole wheat tortilla. Voila! Burrito extraordinaire. For best taste, warm up in the microwave before eating.

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An Egg a Day could Keep Blindness Away - Australia

Studies have shown the humble egg can reduce the risk of developing macular degeneration. With Macular Degeneration Awareness Week being held next week, Australians are being reminded of simple ways to reduce their risk of developing the condition which is the leading cause of blindness in Australia. Studies show that the consumption of one egg a day can reduce the risk of developing macular degeneration.

The study, previously published in The Journal of Nutrition, a leading international nutrition journal, shows that eating one egg per day raises the levels of antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin (which protect the retina) by 26 per cent and 36pc respectively compared with no egg consumption. The results indicate that frequent consumption of foods high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, in particular daily egg consumption, can improve markers of eye health, one the most debilitating diseases of aging.


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Cereal? Not today: Farm-fresh breakfasts give most important meal of the day a fresh angle

Jun 20, 2007 - Knight Ridder Tribune Business News - Author: Karen Herzog


As you're pouring cornflakes from a box or grabbing an energy bar to start the day, do you ever long for a real breakfast?

You know, the kind of hearty wake-up fare associated with crowing roosters and morning milkings? You could whip up an omelet or pancakes and sausage in your own urban kitchen. Or, you could seek an authentic setting for a breakfast menu rooted in the farming lifestyle. Take a weekend road trip to either a rural cafe that serves stick-to-your-ribs breakfast, or a bed-and-breakfast on a farm that offers a morning meal so fresh the eggs still may be warm from the nest. Summer is the time to escape the city and explore Wisconsin's culinary roots. It may be cooler by the lake, but it's hard to beat fresh country air, rolling green hills and a heaping helping of breakfast in the glow of an uninterrupted sunrise.

At John and Dorothy Priske's Fountain Prairie Inn and Farms near Fall River (north of Madison), which they share with about 300 long-haired Highland beef cattle, Dorothy Priske prides herself on preparing breakfast with fresh, seasonal ingredients, eith r produced at Fountain Prairie or other farms whose products are sold at the Dane County Farmers Market in Madison. You may wake up in a restored Victorian bedroom to the smell of the farm's own ham frying in a pan or a coffeecake in the oven, sprinkled with chopped hickory nuts from a neighbor. Here, the emphasis is on freshness and quality rather than quantity.

An evolving rhythm
The classic, full-plate farm breakfast still is part of the rhythm of farm living, but it has evolved just as farming has evolved, said Ann Kaiser, editor of Greendale-based Country Woman magazine, which serves 1 million mostly rural readers across the nited States and Canada. Some farm families still start the day with a hearty breakfast, but others opt for homemade granola, instant oatmeal or cornflakes, she said. "While it is still an important meal, breakfast has lightened up in some farm homes where not as much physical labor is involved in producing the crops and livestock as there had been in the past," said Kaiser, who occasionally accepts invitations from eaders to spend a day working on their farms.

On those visits, she has tried everything from working with sheep to machine-picking asparagus and detassling corn. "From my experiences staying with farm families, I'd say the big, hearty breakfast is no longer the general rule for every day," Kaiser said. "Like the rest of us, they might often have a big breakfast on weekends. Farm families are eating more of a var ety, and likely not as much in the morning as they did a couple of decades ago." Whether it's daily fare or a rare treat, the farm-style breakfast remains a nostalgic experience, Kaiser said. Shrinking connections Many baby boomers in the city grew up with a relative on the farm.

But as the rural population has shrunk, so have the connections to growing one's own food or doing farm chores, Kaiser said. And farmers have followed the dining trends of urban populations, said Edward Lump, president and chief executive officer of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association. "Farmers are dining out more, too." Anyone who does physical labor -- whether it's farming, construction work or another trade -- still appreciates a hearty breakfast on a weekday, Lump said. Some of those folks start their day in a small-town cafe, which remains a bastion of farm-style breakfasts. One such place is the Koffee Kup on Main St.

in Stoughton, south of Madison, which opens at 5 a.m. Many of the Koffee Kup regulars are farmers and retired farmers seeking an occasional hearty breakfast. Construction workers also are regulars. Diners at the Koffee Kup can order breakfast any time of day, including plate-size buttermilk pancakes or waffles, old-fashioned sausage gravy over fresh biscuits, sirloin steak with eggs, hash browns and toast, or an omelet such as the customer favorit Killer Omelet loaded with vegetables, meat and cheese. A place to gather Koffee Kup owner Ken Gulseth used to buy eggs fresh from a farm a mile away until the farmer retired a few years ago.

He still buys tomatoes and onions delivered to the back door by local farmers. Gulseth's parents both grew up on a farm, and he remembers helping with chores at his paternal grandparents' farm. The Koffee Kup is a social networking spot for farmers, Gulseth said. "They enjoy coming in here for breakfast, and if they need help with something on the farm, they can usually find someone here." During the August tobacco harvest (a viable crop in this area), farmers stop in the cafe after selling and delivering their crop to compare notes on yields and discuss prices, Gulseth said. "Most of the ones I know, their wives work off the farm," he said.

So if they want a hearty breakfast, they either have to make it themselves or stop by a cafe. Eighty percent of his customers are repeat customers; two-thirds order breakfast, Gulseth said. Plenty of ingredients He figures each week he goes through 2,700 eggs, 125 pounds of sausage (both patties and links), close to 200 pounds of bacon, 100 pounds of hash browns and 20 gallons of pancake batter. "I believe in making everything big," he said. "Especially breakfast. You listen to your customers and they train you. "When school's out, I get more kids and bigger breakfasts. If I'm not too busy and they want chocolate chips in their pancakes, I accommodate them." When the Atkins diet first came out and was all the rage, requests for meat and eggs doubled, while the popularity of toast and potatoes dropped dramatically, Gulseth said.

Among the breakfast regulars one recent morning around 7:30 was a group of firefighters from the firehouse next door. "I come here for breakfast because my wife's not a morning person," said Scott Wegner, deputy chief of the Stoughton Fire Department, as he dug into a Garbage Omelet. (That's an omelet of three eggs, bacon, ham, sausage, mushrooms, green peppers, onions and tomatoes, Swiss and American cheese and topped with homemade chili for $5.95.) Dorothy's in the kitchen The Koffee Kup has a policy that if firefighters get called out on an emergency before they finish eating, they get a fresh serving "on the house" when they return.

On this day, Wegner was having breakfast with Capt. Don Hanson and assistant chiefs Red Benschop and Dick Kittleson. Benschop ordered French toast, while the assistant chiefs had Kitchen Omelets (a Denver omelet with ham, green peppers, onion and a choice of cheese). Local produce A little later at Fountain Prairie, the Highland beef cattle were enjoying the tall prairie grasses of summer as storm clouds hovered over the farm, and Dorothy was in the kitchen, making her own kind of country breakfast. The Priskes take at least one cow to a local butcher shop each week to produce their dry-aged beef, which they sell at the farmers market and to high-end restaurants.

They also raise Berkshire hogs. A frittata Dorothy prepared this particular day included Swiss cheese from Bleu Mont Dairy Co. in Blue Mound (they know the cheesemaker), organic eggs from the farmers market, ham from their own hogs, asparagus grown by John's brother, Tom, snipped tarr gon and strawberry garnish fresh from Dorothy's garden. What John and Dorothy serve guests for breakfast may be considered "trendy" gourmet because it incorporates fresh herbs and healthful techniques, such as roasting potatoes instead of frying them. But it also reflects the rural tradition of growing one's own food, as John Priske remembers from growing up on a farm near Lodi.

"The emphasis on our farm was to feed the family," John said. "We had a garden with lots of tomatoes, beans, potatoes, cucumbers and sweet corn. And we raised beef, hogs and chickens. Breakfast was eggs and salt pork. I hate cereal." Where food comes from Dorothy grew up on a small dairy farm, drinking milk fresh from the cows. For city residents, it's easy to forget that food doesn't originate in a grocery store, Dorothy said. The Priskes encourage their guests to get a good glimpse of the origin of their meals, as well as an overview of their approach to land stewardship. It's the perfect conversation topic for breakfast on the farm.


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Not Exactly Kissing Cousins: T. Rex Related to Chickens

Scientists say an adolescent female Tyrannosaurus rex died 68 million years ago, but its bones still contain intact soft tissue, including the oldest preserved proteins ever found. A comparison of the protein's chemical structure to a large number of other species showed an evolutionary link between T. rex and chickens, supporting the theory that birds evolved from dinosaurs. According to two studies published in the April 13 issue of the journal, Science, The collagen proteins were found inside the leg bone of the T. rex fossil. Collagen is the primary ingredient of connective tissue in animals, and is located in cartilage, ligaments, tendons, hooves, bones, and teeth. Gelatin and glue are produced when it is boiled in water. Scientists say an adolescent female Tyrannosaurus rex died 68 million years ago, but its bones still contain intact soft tissue, including the oldest preserved proteins ever found. A comparison of the protein's chemical structure to a large number of other species showed an evolutionary link between T. rex and chickens, supporting the theory that birds evolved from dinosaurs.

According to two studies published in the April 13 issue of the journal, Science, The collagen proteins were found inside the leg bone of the T. rex fossil. Collagen is the primary ingredient of connective tissue in animals, and is located in cartilage, ligaments, tendons, hooves, bones, and teeth. Gelatin and glue are produced when it is boiled in water.


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Best Breakfast Advice from Jonny Bowden

[From Bottom Line's Daily Health News, April 9, 2007]

Jonny Bowden, the popular "Weight Loss Coach" on iVillage.com, is a contributing writer to AOL.com and a frequent Daily Health News contributor. His free mini-course "7 Super Foods That Could Change Your Life' is available at www.feelyourpower.com. A radio talk-show host, he's the author of the best-selling Living the Low Carb Life and, most recently, The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth.

Power Breakfast
I seem to have a daily fight with my teenage daughter about eating a good breakfast. She goes for the carbs, and I push the protein. However, if you don't like eggs, the remaining standard breakfast fare includes dairy products (allergenic for many) or bacon and other breakfast meats. If breakfast really is the most important meal of the day, shouldn't we select what we eat more carefully? And what exactly are the proven benefits of eating breakfast in the first place?

"There's an old saying that goes 'Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper,' " said nutritionist and weight-loss coach Jonny Bowden, CNS. "But most of us do the opposite."

According to Bowden, this is exactly the wrong way to eat if we're trying to lose weight. It also works against us if we're trying to keep our energy up during the day and our performance level high. "Remember, you've just completed eight hours without food," he told me. "You're literally breaking a fast. Your body is craving nourishment, and your brain needs glucose to function at its best. Skipping breakfast is one of the worst possible things you can do. You set yourself up for disaster in a number of different ways later in the day."

Indeed, the research points that way. Between 35% and 40% of all Americans skip breakfast, and many kids leave for school without it. The implications are dramatic, both physically and mentally (more on that in a moment). "People who skip breakfast are more than four times as likely to be obese than people who eat something in the morning," Bowden informed me.

Then there's performance. "Numerous studies over the years have shown that skipping breakfast impacts the behavior and mental performance of school kids," Bowden said. "Kids who eat breakfast have better memory, and higher math and reading scores. And kids who are hungry have a large number of behavior problems, including fighting, stealing, having difficulty with teachers and not acknowledging rules."

Additionally, people who eat breakfast are far more likely to get a healthy intake of vitamins and minerals than those who don't. In one study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, researchers found that people who ate a hearty breakfast containing more than one-quarter of their daily calories had a higher intake of essential vitamins and minerals and lower serum cholesterol levels to boot. Sounds weird, doesn't it? Getting adequate and sufficient nutrients when your body needs them is the best way to maintain optimal body function.

THE BEST BREAKFAST
So what constitutes a good breakfast? Is it the high-carb, low-fat "Breakfast of Champions" that was so in vogue several decades ago? Or is it a plate piled high with meat and bacon minus the bread and potatoes à la "Robert Atkins"?

"Higher protein breakfasts translate into a more sustained level of energy throughout the morning and possibly the day," Bowden told me. "Protein fills you up longer, and you're less likely to have midmorning cravings. You're also less likely to overeat at lunch." And higher protein at breakfast may increase metabolism, helping you to maintain a healthy weight. "In one study, a high-protein breakfast increased the metabolism of healthy young women by a shocking 100 percent," Bowden said.

"There are definite advantages to higher protein intakes in the morning," Bowden continued, "but that doesn't mean 10,000 calories of bacon." He recommends that at least one-third of your breakfast come from a lean protein source and the rest from healthy fats and fibrous carbs. "And if you eat eggs, for goodness' sake, don't throw out the yolks," he urged. "They're loaded with good nutrition, and may even lower your cholesterol levels," he added.

"Moreover, don't be afraid to think outside the box," Bowden advised. He pointed out that in Asia, the traditional Japanese breakfast consists of a small piece of fish (like salmon), some light vegetables and a tiny portion of rice, accompanied by a small bowl of miso soup. "The health benefits of fish and vegetables in the morning are huge," Bowden reported. "And the omega-3s in salmon are terrific for your skin, plus they help regulate mood."

If salmon's too much of a stretch for you, Bowden has his own list of favorite breakfasts for more Western palates...
· Eggs. "I think eggs are one of nature's perfect food sources," he told me. "They are loaded with protein and other nutrients such as phosphatidyl choline for the brain and heart." A Bowden breakfast favorite: Scramble some eggs with spinach and sliced apples in some coconut oil, and season with turmeric and lemon pepper. "It's loaded with protein and nutrients for the eyes, like lutein and zeaxanthin," he explained. "Plus the turmeric is one of nature's great anti-inflammatories." (Note: Bowden strongly recommends free-range eggs -- from hens that had access to the outdoors where they could run around and eat more natural food, which changes the fat content and nutrition of their meat and eggs.)

· Yogurt that contains active cultures. "One of my favorite quick breakfasts is yogurt with nuts and red or purple grapes," Bowden said. "I always use goat's or sheep's milk yogurt because it's less likely to have hormones in it and has a better nutrient balance. Then I sprinkle on some walnuts or almonds or pecans."

· Peanut butter and banana sandwich. "If you're someone who can tolerate grains," said Bowden, "buy a good whole-grain bread, preferably sprouted grain, take one slice and make a 'half sandwich' using natural, unsweetened peanut or almond butter, a banana and, if you like, a dollop of yogurt on top."

· Whey protein shake. "Whey is my favorite protein powder," Bowden told me, "because it raises glutathione, the most important antioxidant in the body, and has shown in one study to lower blood pressure by about 5 mmHg. You can make a nutritious shake using water, whey protein and frozen berries, with a little cranberry or pomegranate juice. Or almond or rice milk. Throw in a handful of raw oats for texture -- it tastes much better than it sounds. Adding a splash of olive oil to the shake will reduce the glycemic index and help the smoothie 'stick' with you a little longer. Experiment. Peanut butter is another great add-in."

· Homemade muesli or granola. According to Bowden, "Raw foods have a lot to recommend them. They contain enzymes, they haven't been processed, they tend to have fiber and they're loaded with nutrients."

· Bowden's favorite: "Take some raw oats... soak in a little pomegranate juice... add nuts, berries or sliced apples, and flaked coconut. You can sweeten with xylitol if you need to (though it has been found to cause diarrhea in some), but it's delicious without it. You can also use raw cold-pressed honey or blackstrap molasses if you like."
In my house, we actually eat a lot of grilled chicken and soup for breakfast. Even my know-it-all teenager does this when she takes a break from being a teen. Don't be constrained by recent American traditions. As a reformed blueberry muffin eater, I can attest to the fact that chicken feels much better as the day wears on.


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Do Boxers Drink Raw Eggs?

Boxing trainers praise the egg as an excellent source of muscle-building protein, and admit that drinking a protein shake made with raw eggs is a lot more convenient than making an omelet at the gym.

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Eggs versus Oatmeal

Food scientists say oatmeal has satiety value, which is another way of saying it sticks to the ribs. But nothing beats the pure protein of a breakfast egg or two for keeping one feeling full and satisfied well past 11:00 a.m.

Years of research have concluded that healthy adults can enjoy eggs without significantly impacting their risk of heart disease. A 9,500-subject cohort study published in the January issue of Medical Science Monitor concluded that eating one or more eggs per day does not increase the risk of coronary artery disease or stroke among healthy adults.

[The study] also says that eggs offer a variety of essential nutrients for only 75 calories each. Eggs are the protein with a full complement of amino acids by which other protein foods, including meats and poultry, are measured. Eggs offer the highest-quality protein available - at such a reasonable price and in such a convenient package from Mother Nature. Just keep them covered and refrigerated. (Joyce Rosencrans, The Cincinnati Post, 2/21/07)


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Omelets: Crack, scramble and roll

Eggs are a popular food enjoyed by adults and children alike, and are one of the most versatile.

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31 days to better health

It's January, and many of us are trying to ignore the extra pudge around our middles. This year, do what Carmichael did - make a lifestyle change. Here's a calendar to help you get started.

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Eggs Against MS

In a recent article by Ronald Kotulak in the Chicago Tribune, he reports that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis, one of the more common neurological diseases in young adults, may be significantly reduced with higher blood levels of vitamin D, according to the findings of the first large-scale study of the vitamin and MS. The report first appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The main source of vitamin D is the ultraviolet spectrum of sunlight, which stimulates the skin to produce the vitamin. Smaller amounts of the vitamin are found in oily fish like salmon and in cod liver oil, egg yolks, liver and vitamin D supplements. Milk was fortified with vitamin D in the early 1900s, which ended endemic rickets.
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Fitfood: Heading off the Hungries

In the Rocky Mountain News, Lisa Rykman quotes dietitian Suzanne Farrell, spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. Farrell states that it's recommended that school-age children have three meals and up to three snacks a day. If your child complains of being hungry between breakfast and lunch, kick up the calorie count first thing in the morning, she says. She recommends aiming for a balance between proteins, carbohydrates and good fats, including at least three food groups. Proteins take longer to digest, so they keep people satisfied longer.
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Eggs Help Prevent Lean Muscle Loss

For seniors, ingesting protein can sometimes be difficult. One of the most easily digestible sources of protein is eggs. Eggs provide numerous other benefits as well including 14 essential nutrients needed to stay active and healthy - including vitamin B12, which can stave off fatigue and cartenoids, which collect in the eye and play a role in promoting and improving vision.
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Eggstraordinary Comeback for a Healthy Food

In the past, eggs have received some bad press on account of their cholesterol content and the association of cholesterol with heart disease. Scientists now know that it is actually saturated fat in the diet that raises blood cholesterol.
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Top Ten Grocery Shopping Tips For a Healthy New Year 2007

Here are Debra Holtzman's 10 MUST KNOW Grocery Shopping Tips

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Eating Eggs May Cut Risk of Disease, OSU Reports

New research at Oregon State University suggests that eggs enriched with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a long chain fatty acid, may increase antioxidant activity while helping to rid the body of cholesterol and fats.
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